The UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office recently updated the travel advice for visitors headed to Tanzania. The new advice mentions that a European family were ‘robbed at gun point and their campsite guard killed at south Beach, 20km southeast of Dar es Salaam‘. We have been unable to find further information on the incident at this stage.

Before heading off anywhere, we strongly recommend reading the travel advisory from your Government, and maybe a couple of others if you have time.

Links to travel advice on visiting Tanzania from the following governments –

Please note that the travel advice varies – it is worth reading them all and reaching your own conclusion.

From the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Safety and security

Although most visits to Tanzania are trouble-free, violent and armed crime is increasing. The British High Commission continues to receive several reports each month of British nationals who are the victims of mugging and bag snatching (especially by passing cars or motorbikes) and armed robbery and burglary have increased throughout the country. In December 2016, a European family were robbed at gun point and their campsite guard killed at south Beach, 20km southeast of Dar es Salaam. In Dar es Salaam, British tourists have been kidnapped, robbed and forced with the threat of violence to withdraw cash from ATMs and arrange cash transfers up to £5,000 through Western Union after being befriended by strangers or using unlicensed taxis.

Walk as far away from the road as possible. If you need to walk alongside the road, walk towards the traffic. Avoid carrying large amounts of cash or other valuables including expensive jewellery or watches. Leave your passport in the hotel safe and carry a photocopy for ID. If you’re attacked, don’t resist. If you carry a bag, it is safer to hold it loosely by the handle or hanging off your shoulder rather than by securing the strap across your chest. Don’t accept lifts from strangers or use unlicensed taxis. Ask your local hotel to book a taxi and always ask to see the driver’s ID. Avoid walking alone, particularly in isolated areas and on beaches.

Take particular care in places frequented by tourists. In Dar es Salaam, tourists have been targeted in the city centre, at Ubungo bus station, the peninsula area and Coco beach. In Zanzibar incidents have taken place in Stone Town and at hotels and on popular tourist beaches.

Make sure residential property is secure and lock all doors and windows, especially at night. Your security guard should insist on official identification before allowing anyone to enter your property or compound. If in doubt don’t let them in and raise the alarm.

In 2013, two British women were the victims of an acid attack in Stone Town, Zanzibar. This appeared to be the first acid attack in Zanzibar targeting foreigners.

You should remain vigilant at all times.

from Travel Advice Summary, which can be found at: http://ift.tt/10iQAQ5

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