From the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Latest update: Safety & security section

Local travel

A number of British and foreign visitors have died in Vietnam while engaged in adventure tourism in rural areas. Some terrain can be hazardous and remote from rescue services of any kind. Safety standards are generally lower than in the UK and compliance varies. Don’t stray off main routes and, where required, take a reputable guide. Always follow safety guidelines.

You should avoid illegal tour guides who have been known to offer tours and activities prohibited under local regulations, including in the Dalat/Datanla area. In some areas local regulations require the use of a guide. One British national has died, and another injured and trapped on Fansipan for 48 hours, while trekking without guides. Make sure your travel insurance covers your planned activity fully.

Travel is restricted near military installations and some areas of Vietnam are fairly inaccessible. If you wish to visit a village, commune or ward that is close to the border you may need to get permission from the provincial police department. Contact the relevant local authority for more information.

Unexploded mines and ordnance are a continuing hazard in former battlefields, particularly in central Vietnam and along the Laos Border, formerly traversed by the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Mined areas are often unmarked.

Undertake any leisure activities which include firearms at your own risk and make sure you are supervised by a reputable guide. There have been reports of hearing loss from those close to these activities.

Road travel

A number of British nationals have died in motorbike accidents in Vietnam, and more than 40 have been injured, some very seriously. Before choosing to drive a motorbike in Vietnam, it is essential that you’re an experienced motorcycle rider, have a good quality motorbike helmet, understand the roads on which you plan to travel and that your travel insurance covers your planned activity.

Compliance with local road regulations is poor. You’re advised to keep your speed down and to be prepared for the unexpected. If you’re planning on travelling as a passenger on a motorbike, please wear a good quality helmet and make sure your medical insurance is comprehensive. It’s illegal to be on a motorbike without a helmet.

There are frequent road traffic accidents and fatal crashes. If you’re involved in a traffic accident you could face criminal charges and you may need to pay compensation to the injured person even if the injuries are minor. If you’re involved in an accident or subject to an investigation, offer the police your full co-operation and inform the British Embassy in Hanoi or Consulate General in Hoi Chi Minh City.

From October 2015, International Driving Permits (IDPs) are accepted in Vietnam. You may only drive the category of vehicle for which your permit is valid. You’ll need to show both the IDP and your UK driving licence to the authorities as required. Don’t use your passport as a deposit for hiring vehicles or in place of a fine in the event of a traffic offence. If you don’t have an IDP and you want to drive a car or motorcycle you’ll need to get a Vietnamese driving licence from the Hanoi Department of Public Works and Transportation (telephone: +84 4 3843 5325) or the Ho Chi Minh City Department of Public Works and Transportation (telephone: +84 8 3829 0451 or 0452).

You should also ensure you have third-party insurance as required by Vietnamese law.

Metered taxis from larger firms are generally reliable. There are many taxi operators and meters are set at different prices. The meter should start at around 8,000 to 20,000 VND, depending on the size of the taxi. Where possible get hotels or restaurants to book you a reputable taxi. Always make sure the driver identifies themselves before setting off. If you book a taxi online or through an app, make sure the details of the vehicle and driver match those provided by the company.

There have been reports of overcharging for taxi journeys from airports and tourist hotspots. Check the published fares near the taxi stands before starting your journey.

Bus and coach crashes are not unusual and increase in regularity at night. Vehicles are often poorly maintained. When travelling by bus be vigilant against petty theft. Be cautious about offers of free transfers to hotels unless organised in advance, as these are likely to be bogus.

Rail travel in Vietnam is generally safe. Be aware of the risks of petty theft particularly while asleep on overnight trains.

from Travel Advice Summary, which can be found at: http://ift.tt/11eXLpS

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