The security situation in Nicaragua remains precarious – protests are still very likely and, despite widespread condemnation for excessive force, it is likely this will be met with a hardline response from law enforcement. The InterAmerican Commission on Human Rights reports in the last month 76 people died or were killed during the unrest, 868 were injured and 438 were detained.

Talks between the Nicaragua’s Government and the opposition, brokered by the Roman Catholic Church and overseen by Cardinal Leopoldo Brenes, were suspended on Wednesday due to a lack of progress. It is unclear what will happen next.

The UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office is still advising against all but essential travel to Nicaragua. The US Embassy recommends you do the following if you are already in Nicaragua –

  • If you are safe, please inform your family and friends in the United States.  The Embassy is receiving a high number of calls regarding people’s welfare.
  • If you feel unsafe, make personal arrangements to leave the country; commercial flights are available.  There are no plans for a U.S.-government assisted evacuation.
  • Except in an emergency or to depart the country, restrict travel and remain in your homes as long as the area in which you live is impacted by demonstrations and you feel safe in your home.
  • Maintain adequate supplies of food, potable water, and fuel if sheltering in place.
  • Move to a safer location if demonstrations are nearing your area and you can safely move.
  • Monitor local media: For those of you unfamiliar with news sources inside of Nicaragua, 100% Noticias (known also as Channel 15 or Channel 63 on cable) is the only 24/7 television news channel in the country. For radio, Radio Corporación and Radio Ya are both the closest to 24/7 news stations.
  • Avoid the areas of the demonstrations.
  • Exercise caution if unexpectedly in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests, and do not attempt to drive through any large groups and/or barricades encountered on the street.
  • Keep a low profile.

There is further advice from the US Embassy in Nicaragua and the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office below. 

If you are in Nicaragua or are headed there shortly, make sure you have read as much advice as possible and know what you will do if the situation deteriorates again, including knowing who to contact and how.

Headlines + Updates

Travel advisories

From the FCO, last updated on the 12th but still current as of the 24th of May –

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all but essential travel to Nicaragua.

There has recently been a period of street violence in many areas in Nicaragua. This has involved the use of tear gas, rubber bullets and live ammunition, resulting in serious injuries and deaths. Major routes have become impassable at times due to disorder or roadblocks and we advise that you check local information before undertaking any travel. Marches and demonstrations continue to occur. While some are peaceful, the situation remains volatile and there is the potential for further violence and disorder. If you’re in Nicaragua, you should stay well away from all demonstrations and gatherings, even if apparently peaceful, as it is against Nicaraguan law for foreigners to join marches and participation risks arrest.

There is no British Embassy in Nicaragua. If you need emergency consular assistance, you should contact the British Embassy, Costa Rica, tel +506 2258 2025.

Please click through here to read the rest of the advice.


Latest from the US Embassy, updated on the 22nd of May

Event:  Civil unrest throughout Nicaragua continues to impact U.S. Embassy operations and hours.

The U.S. Embassy in Managua will be closed to the public on May 23, 2018 due to anticipated demonstrations and traffic disruptions at the Enacal intersection near the U.S. Embassy. The U.S. Embassy will provide limited emergency consular services by telephone only. Regular appointments will be rescheduled as quickly as possible.

U.S. Government personnel have been advised to remain in their homes and avoid unnecessary travel.

Recent days’ events have shown that locations, routes, times, sizes, and possible violence at demonstrations are all unpredictable. The U.S. Embassy is aware of roadblocks around the country causing difficult access to and from Matagalpa, Granada and other locations around the country. The Embassy has limited resources to assist U.S. citizens affected by these circumstances.

Until further notice:

  • All routine American citizen services (U.S. passports, reports of births abroad, notarials, etc.) are available by appointment only at https://evisaforms.state.gov.
  • American citizens needing emergency U.S. travel documents (for imminent travel only) may visit the Embassy between 7:30 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. Monday through Friday, when the Embassy has not announced a closure.
  • Embassy Managua is no longer providing routine visa services.  Additional information is available at http://www.ustraveldocs.com\ni.

Actions to Take:

  • If you are safe, please inform your family and friends in the United States.  The Embassy is receiving a high number of calls regarding people’s welfare.
  • If you feel unsafe, make personal arrangements to leave the country; commercial flights are available.  There are no plans for a U.S.-government assisted evacuation.
  • Except in an emergency or to depart the country, restrict travel and remain in your homes as long as the area in which you live is impacted by demonstrations and you feel safe in your home.
  • Maintain adequate supplies of food, potable water, and fuel if sheltering in place.
  • Move to a safer location if demonstrations are nearing your area and you can safely move.
  • Monitor local media: For those of you unfamiliar with news sources inside of Nicaragua, 100% Noticias (known also as Channel 15 or Channel 63 on cable) is the only 24/7 television news channel in the country. For radio, Radio Corporación and Radio Ya are both the closest to 24/7 news stations.
  • Avoid the areas of the demonstrations.
  • Exercise caution if unexpectedly in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests, and do not attempt to drive through any large groups and/or barricades encountered on the street.
  • Keep a low profile.

Assistance:

Please click through here to read the US Embassy website.


If you want further information, here are travel advisories for Nicaragua from the following governments –

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